Merton pupil’s winning flag sets off final stage of Tour of Britain

A former Wimbledon Chase Primary School pupil rubbed shoulders with professional cyclists after he won a competition to design a Tour of Britain start-line flag.

Min Joon with pro cyclist Jasper Bovenhuis and his winning design

Min Joon with pro cyclist Jasper Bovenhuis and his winning design

Keen cyclist Min Joon Park, aged 11, designed a colourful flag which showed cyclists whizzing past London landmarks including the Gherkin, the Houses of Parliament and the London Eye.

The design was used as the official start flag of the final stage of the Tour of Britain. Min-Joon went to the event on Sunday 11 September with his family.

Pupils at the top five performing STARS (Sustainable Travel: Active, Responsible, Safe) schools were invited by Transport for London to take part in a competition to represent how the changing face of London’s roads is making it easier and more enjoyable for families, friends and local communities to cycle.

STARS is an accreditation scheme for schools, nurseries and colleges to inspire young Londoners to travel sustainably, actively, responsibly and safely.

Wimbledon Chase was one of three London schools to be asked to take part based on its impressive cycling credentials. In 2014, they won a silver award, and in 2015 they won a bronze award from Sustrans after encouraging children to cycle or walk to school.

The Tour of Britain is British Cycling’s premier road cycling event and the country’s largest annual free-to-spectate sporting event, giving cycling fans the chance to see the world’s best riders racing on their doorstep every September. The final stage took place in London on Sunday 11 September where riders followed a 100km route around central London.

Wimbledon Chase headteacher Sue Tomes said: “I feel very proud to think one of our children won the competition.

“We told the children in assembly to watch out for it on television and I think they were quite excited about it.”

Min Joon, who is now a pupil at Rutlish School in Wimbledon, said: “My design was inspired by me cycling to school. I love going cycling and go around Wimbledon Common. It is very refreshing and takes my stress away. I go to school by bike as it is easy and healthy for my body. I do not care if it is rainy or sunny. I go cycling by myself so I get my quiet time.”

 

Notes to editors

As part of their accreditation for STARS, schools need to compete a survey of all their pupils to see how they travel to school, and how they would prefer to travel to school and Wimbledon Chase was one of a number of schools which had more than 100 pupils riding to school as their normal mode of transport.